Assessment of Brain Cortical Activation in Passive Movement during Wrist Task Using Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS)

  • Maziar Jalalvandi Department of Radiology, School of Paramedicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6065-8769
  • Hamid Sharini Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3375-2546
  • Yousef Naderi Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Nader Riahi Alam Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9260-4001
Keywords: Hemodynamic, Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, Motor Cortex, Pasive Movement

Abstract

Purpose: Nowadays, the number of people diagnosed with movement disorders is increasing. Therefore, the evaluation of brain activity during motor task performance has attracted the attention of researchers in recent years. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a useful method that measures hemodynamic changes in the brain cortex based on optical principles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the brain’s cortical activation in passive movement of the wrist.

Materials and Methods: In current study, the activation of the brain's motor cortex during passive movement of the right wrist was investigated. To perform this study, ten healthy young right-handed volunteers were chosen. The required data were collected using a commercial 48-channel continuous wave fNIRS machine, using two different wavelengths of 765 and 855 nm at 10 Hz sampling rate.

Results: Analysis of collected data showed that the brain's motor cortex during passive motion was significantly activated (p≤0.05) compared to rest. Motor cortex activation patterns depending on passive movement direction were separated. In different directions of wrist movement, the maximum activation was recorded at the primary motor cortex (M1).

Conclusion: The present study has investigated the ability of fNIRS to evaluate cortical activation during passive movement of the wrist. Analysis of recording signals showed that different directions of movement have specific activation patterns in the motor cortex.

Published
2019-06-30
How to Cite
1.
Jalalvandi M, Sharini H, Naderi Y, Riahi Alam N. Assessment of Brain Cortical Activation in Passive Movement during Wrist Task Using Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS). Frontiers Biomed Technol. 6(2):99-105.
Section
Original Article(s)