Investigate the Frequency Spectrum of Noise Signals Affecting Synchronous Signals of fMRI and fNIRS in Resting and Moving Wrists

  • Yousef Nadery Khojasteh Far Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9978-1633
  • Nader Riahi Alam Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9260-4001
  • Maziar Jalalvandi Department of Radiology, School of Paramedicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6065-8769
  • Hasan Hashemi Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Keywords: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, Low Frequency Oscillations, Noise

Abstract

Purpose: The nerve signals are often contaminated by the non-nerve signals in the same frequency range, i.e. low frequencies in the range of 0.1 Hz. Among the different medical imaging tools, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has been widely used by scientists and scholars due to its high spatial resolution for brain mapping.

Materials and Methods: Also, the use of Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NFIRS) has continued to rise and regarding its high temporal resolution, it is considered as the complement of FMRI.

Results: However, the effect of non-nerve functions is observed in both methods. Specially, by showing that non-nervous Low Frequency Oscillations (LFOs) 1) are merely non-nervous, because they can be measured by the environmental NIRS; 2) their internal origin is close to the heart; 3) in comparison with the available LF models based on respiration and the merely non-nervous changes in heart, they are unique in their spatial and temporal features, it seems that the systemic signals are moving through the cerebral arteries.

Conclusion: In this paper, LF Oscillations (LFOs) are compared with simultaneous NIRS/FMRI. Also, we discuss the non-neurological effects during simple motions of the wrist in FMRI showing that a significant portion of them, especially in motion state networks, are non-nerve and we measure the sensitivity of NIRS to non-neural LFOs through mapping of nerve and non-nerve LFOs with an extra high spatial and temporal resolution.

Published
2019-10-20
How to Cite
1.
Nadery Khojasteh Far Y, Riahi Alam N, Jalalvandi M, Hashemi H. Investigate the Frequency Spectrum of Noise Signals Affecting Synchronous Signals of fMRI and fNIRS in Resting and Moving Wrists. Frontiers Biomed Technol. 6(3):139-147.
Section
Original Article(s)